First Dive

April 28, 2009

Sewergator?

Sewergator?

Clearly Ms. Coventry and her lawyer Louis had seen something unusual—or had they? The dog could have simply gotten caught in some underwater muck and drowned. Typically, alligators live in the south eastern portion of the United States, in the lagoons and swamps. They are usually between 6 and 14 feet. Crocodiles, on the other hand, are not native to the US. It is for this reason that I knew we were searching for an alligator. I still had many questions though: was this one isolated case? Or was there a colony of alligators just below the city’s surface? Smaller alligators tend to live in large groups. Unfortunately, neither Ms. Coventry nor her lawyer were able to see how large the animal was because it was partly submerged.

The Diving Saucer

The Diving Saucer

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, located between 86th and 96th streets, can certainly sustain a population of large reptiles. According to Central Park’s official website, the reservoir, “covers a full one eight of the park’s surface. The 106-acre water body is 40 feet deep and holds over a billion gallons of water,” (http://www.centralpark.com/pages/attractions/reservoir.html). Until 1991, the reservoir was an integral portion of the fresh water supply in the city. Since then though, it has been largely converted into an aesthetic attraction and this has allowed the park’s wildlife to live there in peace. Though not able to utilize Calypso, my ship, in the reservoir, I decided to investigate this incident with my crew using the Diving Saucer. The Saucer can dive as far as 350 meters (equal to approximately 1,150 feet) and can stay underwater for up to five hours (http://www.cousteau.org/technology/diving-saucer). This tool would be perfectly suited to an exploration of the vast reservoir.

Taking a member of my crew with me, the Diving Saucer was transported to New York and prepared for the dive ahead. Alligators are nocturnal, and so I thought that we would descend in the manner of an alligator, at night, in order to catch a glimpse. When we finally descended beneath the dark, still waters of the reservoir, I kept the Diving Saucer’s lights dimmed. I did not want to frighten any creatures, especially this alligator. We viewed the magnificent wildlife that calls the reservoir their home, but still we did not see any sign of the alligator.

As it does every morning, the sun began to rise at about 5:30. My crew members and I had scanned the waters from above and below the surface, but we had not seen an alligator or, for that matter, any unusual or large creature. Though beautiful and majestic, the small fish and birds native to the reservoir were not what we had come in search for. I felt disappointed, but I was not discouraged. We had set out two weeks after the incident relayed by Ms. Coventry. By now, the alligator could have easily wandered over land to another body of water in the park, or could have entered one of the many abandoned sewer tunnels leading into the heart of the city.

I needed more interviews, more information. The reports of a “sewergator” were numerous, but many dated back many, many years. The alligator of the 1935 reports would not be alive today. If the reports have any truth to them, that alligator(s) would have left descendants; Pollock’s could have been one of those descendants. In the wild, alligators can live from 35 to 50 years and they reach sexual maturity at about 10 to 12 years of age. That means that there is a possibility that seven generations of gators have been born since the original sewergater, five of which could still be swimming in the depths, and every generation increasingly adapted to their adopted environment. I absolutely had to find this hidden habitat.

“Alligators kept as specimens at the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries aquarium in Washington, D.C, are being tried out as plumber’s assistants to open up clogged pipes. Placed in a length of pipe that is stopped up with silt and sediment, the reptile digs his way through, opening up a small hole which water later will widen by its pressure as it sweeps through.”

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From: http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2007/04/04/plumbers-use-alligators-to-open-clogged-pipes/

brooklyn

Wednesday November 29, 2006 – “It was found behind an apartment building in Brooklyn, not in the sewers of Manhattan; it isn’t particularly big (under two feet long, police say); nor is it even, strictly speaking, an alligator (it’s a caiman).  Still, press reports on yesterday’s discovery of an abandoned saurian are likening it to the age-old urban legend about discarded pet alligators thriving in the New York City sewer system. Some say the creatures grow to monstrous size and turn white due to the lack of sunlight.

The urban legend is false, of course, but “gator” sightings do occur with some regularity in New York and environs, odd as it seems. The last such incident happened five years ago, when a specimen of similar size — dubbed “Damon the Caiman” by city officials — was captured in Central Park. Though illegal in the city, caimans can be bought on the Internet and are sometimes kept as pets, only to be abandoned when they outgrow their welcome.”

From David Emery’s Urban Legend Blog (urbanlegend.about.com)

Alligator vs. Caiman - Caimans are the most common alligator pets. They are a so called miniature alligator.

Alligator vs. Caiman - Caimans are the most common alligator pets. They are a so called miniature alligator.

“Although the story of the ‘Sewer Gator’ in New York City is well known and various versions have been told and built up over the decades, recent reports validate that the stories are much more than urban myth.

A trapper reported an abundance of the reptiles in sewers in Ormond Beach, Florida, as he told WFTV that they were using the sewer to travel through the city after sighting the first one with its tail sticking out from a sewer pipe in October 2005.”

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From: http://www.lifeinthefastlane.ca/weirdest-things-found-in-sewers-and-drains/offbeat-news

sewergator

“New Yorkers are supposed to be born skeptics, but we’re actually the most accomplished spinners of these tall tales. Not only is New York featured in urban legends that spread around the globe, there are scores of homegrown legends associated with Gotham landmarks.

“Because this city is so large and diverse, it’s particularly rich in urban myths,” says Steve Zeitlin, director of CityLore, a Manhattan-based organization that collects area folklore.

From sewer alligators to skyscraper-spooking ghosts, urban legends are the contemporary equivalent of fairy tales, injecting a note of the fantastic into otherwise predictable modern life. But no matter how bizarre, most urban legends are just this side of believable — and often betray real concern about issues such as crime, health care and sexual promiscuity.”

From “Tales from the Urban Crypt: Legendary Whoppers about Gotham run the Ghastly and Ghostly Gamut” by J. D. Heiman

See: http://www.delorenzosdugout.com/urbanlegends.htm

The Alligator People _1959_

Possible images of Alligator/People Hybrids from the 1959 film “The Alligator People.”

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AlligatorPeople

Alligator People

Alligator People - 2

Alligator_people_(1959)

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Film Trailer:

On Urban Legends

April 24, 2009

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“I also found the fabled albino New York City sewer alligator. They are extinct now. Maybe the C.H.U.D.s killed them all?”

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From: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/klugx004/theblog/cat_music.html

Canstruction

April 24, 2009

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SAN DIEGO –  Dec. 13, 2004 – Representing the urban legend of the “New York City Sewergator,” a sculpture of an alligator made out of Chicken of the Sea chunk light tuna cans is the 2nd place Peoples’ Choice Winner for a Canstruction event.

Canstruction is a charity event held in cities across the United States and abroad where architecture and engineering firms design and build sculptures composed entirely of canned food.  After the event, food is donated to local food banks and shelters.

For the first time in Canstruction’s 12-year history, the public was invited to vote for their favorite sculptures, which were on display at the New York Design Center.  More than 2,700 votes were cast between Nov. 11 and Nov. 24; votes were tallied Dec. 2.

The “NYC Sewergator” was created by Weidlinger Associates and used approximately 1,300 3-ounce, 6-ounce and 12-ounce Chicken of the Sea Chunk Light Tuna cans, which were donated by the seafood company.

Quotes from the Experts

April 24, 2009

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“The theme of displaced creatures is an old one, and modern folklore has spawned many rumors of an animal — usually a fearsome one — lurking where it does not belong.” — Jan Harold Brunvand, folklorist

“I would bring leftovers from lunch, a long line and a hook, and spend a part of each day in the sewers looking for alligators. I saw rats, cockroaches — probably caught a lot of sicknesses — but I never saw anything like an alligator.” — Frank Indiviglio, herpetologist

“It’s like the Loch Ness Monster or the Big Foot. People believe in those stories up to a point that it does make sense.” — Esteban Rodriguez, NYC sewer worker

“What could better serve as a metaphor for the city as a jungle than the belief that the New York sewer system is filled with albino alligators, which swim through toilet pipes and bite victims in public washrooms?” — Gary Alan Fine, folklorist